04th Mar2012

Eric Bibb ‘Deeper in the Well’ (Dixie Frog/Harmonia Mundi) 4/5

by ukvibe

Acoustic blues and all round Americana musician Eric Bibb has impeccable musical credentials, being the son of folk singer Leon Bibb, with an uncle, pianist and composer in the MJQ, John Lewis, and counting among family friends Bob Dylan, the late Paul Robeson and Pete Seeger. Indeed Bibb junior belongs, along with Corey Harris and Keb Mo, to a generation that has grown up during the folk revival of the 1960s and has taken on board multiple influences both within and outside the established blues tradition. A recent apprearance on the latest series of the Transatlantic sessions on BBC4 revealed the singer-songwriter and guitarist to be interested in exploring all aspects of American roots music and this is precisely what he delivers on this supremely craftly new album. Alternative country, blues, folk and gospel come together effortlessly here and the sheer panoramic view that Eric Bibb is able to portray is breathtaking and definitely not something to be taken for granted. The key point here is that all his diverse influences slot naturally into a cohesive whole and that is the true sign of a individually-minded musician. 

A song that Bibb heard performed by Doc Watson and son Earl ‘Dig a little deeper in the well’ provides one of the many album highlights with fine fiddle playing and beautiful melodies. Folk-blues permeate the classic composition ‘Sinner man’ with some outstanding vocals while there are hints of Kelly Joe Phelps on the acoustic flavoured ‘No further’ with guitar and harmonica supplying some rock solid accompaniment, and the storytelling quality to Bibb’s music is emphasized on ‘Boll weevil’. A couple of contemporary standards receive the Bibb makeover with a warm and intimate ‘Time they are a changin’ which continues to be a relevant song while Taj Mahal’s ‘Every wind in the river’ is deeply melodic and further evidence that Bibb can make virtually any song his own. Eric Bibb achieves that most surprising of goals for listeners who view the blues as being obsessed with darkness and despair; he produces music that is fundamentally uplifting of the human spirit. This is an album that is likely to be on the end of year top ten lists, not necessarily for its innovative approach, but purely and simply for being one of the most enjoyable listening experiences of the year and that is recommendation enough.

Tim Stenhouse

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