Niney Presents ‘Deep roots Observer style’ 4 CD box set (VP) 4/5

Winston Holness aka Niney the Observer is one of reggae’s finest and distinctive prodcuers and has been plying his trade since 1969 when he first began production work with Joe Gibbs and the nprosduced the seminal roots tune ‘Rasta no born yeh’ for Sang Hugh in 1972. In fact even before this he was involved in the music industry as a singer and this probably explains why he was so sensitive to the needs of other musicians. On this new box set four original albums from the 1970s are presented with their original facsimile sleeves and the trademark eye logo that became synonymous with Niney’s 1970s roots productions on the box set cover, here lovingly illustrated by the man behind the superb graphics for those Greensleeves 12” singles and albums, Tony McDermott. Of all his collaborations that Niney enjoyed with singer Dennis Brown was, perhaps, the closest of all and so the re-issue of one of Brown’s hardest to find (on vinyl certainly and in general there are selected songs available on CD compilations) albums in its original form is a real treat. There is no shortage of listening heaven here, but key songs include ‘Tribulation’, ‘So long Rastafari’ and ‘Voice of my father’. Best of all is ‘If you’re rich, help the poor’ which could almost be a rallying call for the present day. Legendary vocal group the Heptones had already established themselves in the premier league of harmony groups by the time they and Niney hooked up for the late-1970s album ‘Better days’, the group having first worked at Studio One and then during the mid-1970s under the creative production talents of Harry J and especially one Lerry Perry with the epic ‘Party time’ album. However, the group did change personnel with lead singer Leroy Sibbles leaving to be replaced by Dolphin ‘Naggo’ Morris. Thankfully the Heptones were still capable of delivering some fine roots songs and in ‘Crystal blue persuasion’ and the steppers favourite ‘Through the fire I come’, many a revival session has subsequently been lit up. Actually the album is pretty strong throughout with one of the group’s most endearing melodies being ‘Temptation, botheration and tribulation’, a seminal roots tune and ‘Holy Mount Zion’ is only marginally less effective. 

DJ I-Roy was one of the roots era’s most compelling and entertaining social commentators and the partnership with Niney resulted in the album ‘The Observer book of I-Roy’. A major highlight here is the inclusion of a bonus 12” cut ‘Jah is my light’/’Wicked eat dirt’ featuring Leroy Smart and I-Roy, but the original album is equally impressive. There is a feel of Lee Perry’s ‘Police and thieves’ production on ‘Jah come here’ and one presumes that Holness was listening closely to the experimentation emanating from the Black Ark studios. One of the best loved tunes on the album is ‘Sister maggie breast’ which borrows the riddim from Dennis Brown’s ‘Woles and leopards’ classic. For lovers of steppers with a healthy dosage of dub echo look no further than ‘Jamaican grill/Observer in fine style’. I-Roy’s inimitable DJ intro is heard on ‘Native land’. Finally there is a follow up dub album to ‘Dubbin’ with the Observer’ which cemented Niney’s reputation as an all-round top roots producer. The second instalment, ‘Observation of life dub’, by Page One and the Observers is not quite on a par with its predecessor, but a strong set nonethless with reworkings of the aforementioned Heptones vocal album. 
Of these new interpretations, ‘Nuff bread on the table’ is notable for its pulsating beat and distinctive keyboard licks, and there is also some pared down drum and bass on ‘Africa’s time now’. This is a first rate anthology of Niney’s work and only marginally short of a five star rating. At least two of the albums are deserving of belonging in that category.

Tim Stenhouse