Noir Désir ‘Soyons désinvoltes. N’ayons l’air de rien (Best of)’ 2CD/DVD (Blue Wrasse) 4/5

With between 400,00 and 500,00 French nationals resident in the UK, this mere statistic alone provides a significant commercial potential and unsurprisingly the music industry has begun to take note of their potential, particularly when so many of this new generation of emigrants are in their twenties, thirties and forties. British interest in the French music scene has been highly selective and tends either to take a sugar-coated nostalgic look at the 1960s and before (Françoise Hardy, early Johnny Halliday), or else psychadelic and other rock influences (Serge Gainsbourg), or instead focuses on a limited number of new artists for their individual style (Camille), or finally instrumental groups that easily transcend linguistic barriers (Daft Punk, Air). An anthology of the new generation of singer-songwriters who surfaced during the 1970s (Souchon, Lavilliers, Le Forestier etc.) aimed specifically at an English-speaking audience with clear explanations is required to rectify matters and this would only be touching the surface for there is a wealth of musical talent hitherto unknown in the UK. 

Where do Noir Désir fit into this musical jigsaw? They are very much rooted in the alternative music scene that emerged in France during the 1980s and especially 1990s as a reaction, partly to the French equivalent of the ‘X factor’, referred to more generally in France as the ‘star system’, and partly as a direct response to the rise of the extreme right party, the Front National. If one had to categorise them at all, then it would probably be in the indie rock field, though their influences are above all French (especially in outlook and use of lyrics) and they can be seen as direct musical descendents of 1970s group Téléphone and even Manu Chao’s first group Manu Negra rather than as a mere pastiche of English-speaking rock music. Lead singer Bertrand Cantet typifies the group’s approach as a whole, with a philosophy degree, a voracious reader of banned poets and a clear left of centre vision of the world. The compilation is well conceived with all their major hits contained including. perhaps, their best known song ‘Le vent nous portera’ and others which cover sensitive social issues. For example ‘Un jour en France’ deals with racism and xenophobia in French society while ‘L’homme pressé’ is an emphatic rejection of the manufactured music being produced via television talent shows. One song missing is the group’s attack on unbridled captialism with an English title, ‘Holy economic war’. In many respects this was a visionary tale of what would come to pass with the current economic recession and possibly the group’s very public own struggle with their label Barclay being taken over by multi-national Universal was a little too close to the bone to be considered for inclusion here. Whatever the case, this package nonetheless offers a comprehensive overview of the group, especially with extensive DVD footage (two and a half hours no less) that includes video and concert music from French television. Sadly, the group’s future came to an abrupt halt when lead singer Cantat’s partner, the actress Marie Trintignant, was tragically killed with Cantat directly implicated in a highly mediatised coverage and the singer went to prison. Upon his release the group attempted two more songs, but the old chemistry was no longer there and they disbanded. Their influence on contemporary French music is immense and, for anyone who is interested in examining what their contemporaries across the Channel listen to, this will prove to be an eye opening experience. A pity there are no lyrics either in French, or English which would have enhanced the listener’s enjoyment.

Tim Stenhouse