Robert Glasper Experiment ‘Black Radio’ (Blue Note) 3/5

Keyboardist Robert Glasper has consistently maintained a foot in both jazz and contemporary black music fields and thus it should come as no surprise that he would wish to combine the two for an album showcasing various vocalists on the current rap and R ‘n’ B scene. While he is to be applauded for this endeavour which works in some places here, the sheer number of guest artists on board for this CD makes the overall objective an impossible one to achieve and, crucially, it relegates Glasper himself to a bit sideman part, leaving the listener with the decidely uncomfortable feeling that this has been a lost opportunity. First of all let us focus on the positive aspects. The inclusion of singers of the calibre of Eryka Badu and Meshell Ndegecello is a mouthwatering prospect and, had they been given more time and songs to develop a musical rapport with Glasper, we could have been talking about a recording of some substance. Badu’s vocal pyrotechnics are ideally suited to improvisation while Ndegecello’s eclectic approach and multi-instrumental skills would make for an ideal partnership with Robert Glasper. Why, then, was this avenue not explored on an entire album? As it is, Badu and Glasper combine on a reworking of Mongo Santmaria’s classic ‘Afro Blue’, but even this does not really afford the chanteuse the opportunity to show off her vocal range over some tasty keyboards improvisations. Glasper becomes largely a sideshow here, but nevertheless he does resurface in jazzier mode on the excellent ‘Gonna be alright (F.T.B.)’ that introduces talented vocalist Bedisi and features some lovely fender licks that we have come to love and admire from Glasper. Possibly best of all is ‘Letter to Hermoine’ where the music finally comes alive and we have an extended piano solo from the leader as well as subtle flute playing. Now for the negative. If Robert Glasper truly wishes to make a rap-dominated album, then he should be allowed to do so, but this should be strictly separate from his jazz-inspired career (unless of course he chooses some rappers who truly know their jazz such as Tribe Called Quest) and much of the jazz-rap terrain has already been explored and exhausted by a variety of musicians during the 1990s. Indeed on the title track Glasper might as well have not been there and in general the rap collaborations are at once unfulfilling and sound a trifle dated. Of the other collaborations, Lalah Hathaway makes a good attempt at Sade’s (why are there not more covers of this contemporary classic chanteuse?) ‘Cherish the day’, taken here at a slower pace than on the original. If it is back to the drawing board for Robert Glasper for the time being, at the very least this blending of genres has given the pianist the opportunity to see and hear what works and what does not, and that in itself may long-term prove to be a valuable lesson. A mixed emotional experience for Robert Glasper’s devoted fans of which this writer is a paid up member. Tim Stenhouse

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